China

Big Questions for the Quad
China

Big Questions for the Quad

If you would like to receive Situation Report in your inbox every Thursday, please sign up here . Here’s what’s on tap for the day: The White House gears up for the Quad summit , the Biden administration’s revolving door begins whirling, and the State Department looks to beef up its China staff . Welcome to Foreign Policy ’s SitRep! It’s raining here in Washington, so we’ve been cozying up to pumpkin spice lattes and dreaming of Oktoberfest. Welcome to Foreign Policy’s SitRep! It’s raining here in Washington, so we’ve been cozying up to pumpkin spice lattes and dreaming of Oktoberfest. Here’s what’s on tap for the day: The White House gears up for the Quad summit, the Biden administration’s revolving door begins whirling, and the State Department looks to beef up its China staff. If y...
Don’t Underestimate the AUKUS Rift With France
China

Don’t Underestimate the AUKUS Rift With France

Of course, bold strategic moves and new alliances have costs. Canada and New Zealand, the two other members of the Five Eyes intelligence-sharing relationship alongside Australia, Britain, and the United States, were unsettled. New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern told Morrison that the new nuclear-powered subs would not be welcomed in New Zealand’s waters, though it is not clear how Wellington—long the weakest link among the Five Eyes—would know. In any case, neither Ottawa nor Wellington has requirements for deterrence capabilities in the Pacific comparable to Australia’s. And nothing in AUKUS diminishes the advantages they already receive from their Five Eyes status. The solution is bold. The United States and Britain will share their highly sensitive nuclear propulsion technology...
How America Forgot It Needed to Understand The Enemy
China

How America Forgot It Needed to Understand The Enemy

That, at least, was the prevailing view, but a small and unusual group of intelligence analysts inside the United States disagreed, warning that Germans would lose the will to fight only with the invasion and destruction of the Wehrmacht itself. And the opinion of those unique experts carried weight. They were not only Germans (many of them Jews who had fled the Nazi regime), but they were also trenchant social critics, leading members of the Frankfurt School of Critical Theory. (The name of the school itself was coined after World War II , although it existed as a social research institute.) As declassified records of their reports reveal, they were frequently correct in their assessments of how German social structures shaped the war. Their focus on cultural and societal forces proved in...
Indian Army Contingent Welcomed At 6th Edition Of SCO’s ‘Peaceful Mission’ Exercise
China

Indian Army Contingent Welcomed At 6th Edition Of SCO’s ‘Peaceful Mission’ Exercise

The Indian Army contingent participating in the sixth edition of the ‘Peaceful MIlitary’ exercise organised by the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) was welcomed by Major General Ivan Tereschenko, Chief of Staff, Central Military District, Russian Armed Forces on Thursday, September 16. The Indian Army had participated in the sixth edition of the 'Peaceful Mission' military exercise on Thursday to foster close relations between SCO member states in Orenburg, Russia. The sixth edition of SCO’s ‘Peaceful Mission’ exercise From September 13 to 25, Russia is hosting the 6th iteration of the exercise Peaceful Mission in the Orenburg Region. The exercise's goal is to strengthen links between SCO member states and to improve military chiefs' ability to command multi-national military con...
Stalled North Korea Talks Show UNGA’s Limits
China

Stalled North Korea Talks Show UNGA’s Limits

If you would like to receive U.N. Brief in your inbox in the future, please sign up here . Here’s what’s on tap for today: North Korea nuclear diplomacy is going nowhere fast, a snapshot of the global economy before and after the effects of the coronavirus pandemic, and an interview with the NATO secretary-general. Welcome back to U.N. Brief, Foreign Policy’s pop-up guide to this year’s United Nations General Assembly (UNGA). Today is the last day of the newsletter as the high-level week winds down. Welcome back to U.N. Brief, Foreign Policy’s pop-up guide to this year’s United Nations General Assembly (UNGA). Today is the last day of the newsletter as the high-level week winds down. Here’s what’s on tap for today: North Korea nuclear diplomacy is going nowhere fast, a snapshot of the ...
China’s Social Credit System Is Actually Quite Boring
China

China’s Social Credit System Is Actually Quite Boring

The SCS’s main aim is to improve the enforcement of legal and administrative rules. Food safety scandals are a recurring problem in China, as are workplace safety issues, wage arrears, and noncompliance with contracts and court orders. When it came to tackling these problems, there were laws in place, but enforcement was lackluster, and anyone who did get caught could simply go to the next province and reoffend. The SCS was meant to help by enabling data sharing between agencies and introducing nationwide blacklists to coerce offenders into compliance. Surveillance and repression of political dissidents or minorities were left to other, more invasive initiatives, such as the Golden Shield and Sharp Eyes projects. China’s social credit system (SCS) is the best example. For years, the syste...
Coronavirus Threat Hangs Over U.N. General Assembly
China, Environment, Human Rights

Coronavirus Threat Hangs Over U.N. General Assembly

If you would like to receive U.N. Brief in your inbox this week, please sign up here . Here’s what’s on tap for today: Coronavirus woes precede the annual summit, the U.N. chief settles on a new envoy for Myanmar , tracking Team Biden ’s plans, and diplomats engage in last-ditch efforts to avert climate catastrophe . Welcome back to U.N. Brief, Foreign Policy’s pop-up guide to this year’s United Nations General Assembly (UNGA). Here’s what’s on tap for today: Coronavirus woes precede the annual summit, the U.N. chief settles on a new envoy for Myanmar, tracking Team Biden’s plans, and diplomats engage in last-ditch efforts to avert climate catastrophe. If you would like to receive U.N. Brief in your inbox this week, please sign up here. Can UNGA Avoid a Superspreader Event? The U.N. ...
Denounce Guinea’s Coup—and Incumbent Leaders’ Abuses of Power
China, Human Rights, Politics

Denounce Guinea’s Coup—and Incumbent Leaders’ Abuses of Power

Coming on the heels of successful coups in neighboring Mali and Chad, and an unsuccessful attempt in Niger, the coup has revived fears of military governments. Doumbouya wants to be seen as a defender of democracy against one-man rule, paraphrasing in his first televised public address sentiments of the late Ghanaian military strongman-turned-President Jerry Rawlings: “If the people are crushed by their elites, it is up to the army to give the people their freedom,” Doumbouya said. On Sept. 5, Guinea’s controversial President Alpha Condé was deposed from power by an elite military group led by Col. Mamady Doumbouya that was established in 2018 to battle growing terrorist threats in the region. On Sept. 5, Guinea’s controversial President Alpha Condé was deposed from power by an elite mi...
Neither Russia nor China Could Fill a U.S. Void in the Middle East
China, Environment

Neither Russia nor China Could Fill a U.S. Void in the Middle East

But such concerns are misguided. Neither Russia nor China is capable of filling a supposed U.S. void in the Middle East, nor do they desire to. More recently, however, the topic of great-power competition among the United States, Russia, and China in the Middle East has increasingly moved to the forefront of such debates, and U.S. officials and policy analysts have begun raising the alarm over the possibility of Moscow or Beijing filling the void if Washington were to withdraw militarily from the region. The 20th anniversary of 9/11 and America’s withdrawal from Afghanistan have renewed debate over whether the United States should remain so deeply engaged militarily in the broader Middle East. These debates typically center on whether such a presence is needed to ensure the safe transit ...
Moscow Expands Its Military Footprint on NATO’s Borders
China

Moscow Expands Its Military Footprint on NATO’s Borders

Neighboring Poland declared a state of emergency along its eastern border with Belarus last week ahead of the military exercises. Baltic states Latvia and Lithuania have also declared states of emergencies as all three countries have seen a huge increase in the number of migrants from the Middle East and North Africa looking to cross into the European Union from Belarus—thought to have been deliberately sent to the border by Lukashenko. Then, on Sunday, Lukashenko added to tensions by announcing that Belarus would buy $1 billion worth of Russian military equipment over the next four years. The joint war games with Belarus, known as Zapad, are held every four years. But this year, the military relationship between the two countries is being closely studied, as Belarus has been drawn closer...